The Nutrient Density of Various Foods, Part 5; Potatoes

It can be difficult to know if you are lacking in certain nutrients without doing extensive analysis of all the foods you eat. To make this easier I decided to make a system of nutrient density and examine various foods. My nutrient density ranks are as follows:

Take 500 calories of a certain food. If that food contains 200% of the recommended daily allowance (or RDA) of a certain nutrient it is considered “very high” in said nutrient. If it contains 100% or more of the RDA it is “high” in said nutrient. Between 60 to 99% RDA per 500 calories will be “Moderately high”. Between 30 and 59% will be “Moderate”. Between 15 and 29% will be “sufficient”. Finally, below 15% will be “low”.

I will only cover micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) and am excluding sodium and vitamin D (as I don’t think these nutrients have specific sources, i.e. salt and sunshine respectively). Here are potatoes ranked:

Potatoes

  • Very high in N/A
  • High in N/A
  • Moderately high in Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, Copper, Potassium
  • Moderate in Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Manganese
  • Sufficient in Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Zinc
  • Low in Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Calcium, Selenium

The Nutrient Density of Various Foods, Part 4; Avocado

It can be difficult to know if you are lacking in certain nutrients without doing extensive analysis of all the foods you eat. To make this easier I decided to make a system of nutrient density and examine various foods. My nutrient density ranks are as follows:

Take 500 calories of a certain food. If that food contains 200% of the recommended daily allowance (or RDA) of a certain nutrient it is considered “very high” in said nutrient. If it contains 100% or more of the RDA it is “high” in said nutrient. Between 60 to 99% RDA per 500 calories will be “Moderately high”. Between 30 and 59% will be “Moderate”. Between 15 and 29% will be “sufficient”. Finally, below 15% will be “low”.

I will only cover micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) and am excluding sodium and vitamin D (as I don’t think these nutrients have specific sources, i.e. salt and sunshine respectively). Here are avocados ranked:

Avocado

  • Very high in N/A
  • High in N/A
  • Moderately high in Vitamin B5, Copper, Folate
  • Moderate in Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B6, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Potassium
  • Sufficient in Vitamin B1, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Zinc
  • Low in Vitamin B12, Choline, Vitamin A, Calcium, Selenium

The Nutrient Density of Various Foods, Part 3; Bananas

It can be difficult to know if you are lacking in certain nutrients without doing extensive analysis of all the foods you eat. To make this easier I decided to make a system of nutrient density and examine various foods. My nutrient density ranks are as follows:

Take 500 calories of a certain food. If that food contains 200% of the recommended daily allowance (or RDA) of a certain nutrient it is considered “very high” in said nutrient. If it contains 100% or more of the RDA it is “high” in said nutrient. Between 60 to 99% RDA per 500 calories will be “Moderately high”. Between 30 and 59% will be “Moderate”. Between 15 and 29% will be “sufficient”. Finally, below 15% will be “low”.

I will only cover micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) and am excluding sodium and vitamin D (as I don’t think these nutrients have specific sources, i.e. salt and sunshine respectively). Here are bananas ranked:

Bananas

  • Very high in N/A
  • High in Vitamin B6
  • Moderately high in Manganese
  • Moderate in Potassium, Copper, Vitamin C, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B2, Magnesium
  • Sufficient in Folate, Vitamin B3, Phosphorus
  • Low in Selenium, Calcium, Vitamin K, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin B12, Zinc, Vitamin B1, choline

The Nutrient Density of Various Foods, Part 2; Black Beans

It can be difficult to know if you are lacking in certain nutrients without doing extensive analysis of all the foods you eat. To make this easier I decided to make a system of nutrient density and examine various foods. My nutrient density ranks are as follows:

Take 500 calories of a certain food. If that food contains 200% of the recommended daily allowance (or RDA) of a certain nutrient it is considered “very high” in said nutrient. If it contains 100% or more of the RDA it is “high” in said nutrient. Between 60 to 99% RDA per 500 calories will be “Moderately high”. Between 30 and 59% will be “Moderate”. Between 15 and 29% will be “sufficient”. Finally, below 15% will be “low”.

I will only cover micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) and am excluding sodium and vitamin D (as I don’t think these nutrients have specific sources, i.e. salt and sunshine respectively). Here are black beans ranked:

Black Beans

  • Very high in N/A
  • High in Folate, Iron
  • Moderately high in Magnesium, Copper, Manganese, Vitamin B1, Phosphorus
  • Moderate in Zinc
  • Sufficient in Vitamin B6, Vitamin B2, Potassium, Vitamin B5
  • Low in Vitamin B3, Selenium, Calcium, Vitamin K, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, choline

The Nutrient Density of Various Foods, Part 1; Brown Rice

On the average day do you reach or at least get close to reaching the recommended daily allowances of all the essential vitamins and minerals? If you’re like most people I’m sure the answer is either “I have no idea” or “No I don’t” or “Who cares?”

It can be difficult to know if you are lacking in certain nutrients without doing extensive analysis of all the foods you eat. To make this easier I decided to make a system of nutrient density and examine various foods. I will examine foods and rank the amount of vitamins and minerals they are abundant in, are lacking in, and so on. My nutrient density ranks will be as follows:

Take 500 calories of a certain food. If that food contains 200% of the recommended daily allowance (or RDA) of a certain nutrient it is considered “very high” in said nutrient. If it contains 100% or more of the RDA it is “high” in said nutrient. Between 60 to 99% RDA per 500 calories will be “Moderately high”. Between 30 and 59% will be “Moderate”. Between 15 and 29% will be “sufficient”. Finally, below 15% will be “low”.

I will only cover micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) and am excluding sodium and vitamin D (as I don’t think these nutrients have specific sources, i.e. salt and sunshine respectively). Let’s start with brown rice as an example.

Brown Rice

  • Very high in Manganese
  • High in N/A
  • Moderately high in Selenium
  • Moderate in Vitamin B1, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B6, Phosphorus
  • Sufficient in Vitamin B5, Zinc, Iron
  • Low in Vitamin B2, Vitamin B12, Folate, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin E, Potassium, Calcium, Vitamin A, Choline

Sugar and Inflammation (and graphs galore)

Those who read this blog might know that I think fructose, or refined sugar, is ok in moderation. I find that many of sugar’s negative effects hinge on its dose and how it is used and I would never categorize it as a “toxin” as a number of folks seem to. In a blog post entitled Sugar and Diabetes I rallied against the claim that sugar causes the aforementioned disease, pointing out that fructose doesn’t promote insulin resistance except when consumed in doses at or above 100 grams a day or as part of a hyper caloric diet. Thus, if sugar isn’t making you fat and it isn’t displacing important nutrients you can consume quite a bit of it before it incurs any deleterious effects on blood sugar control. However, this is only one aspect of health. Continue reading

A Review of Diet and Heart Disease in the Context of the Mediterranean Diet

Heart Disease and The Mediterranean Diet(s)

Our nutrition voyage begins in the city of Lyon. It was here in France’s second largest city that a team of researchers, led cardiologist Michel de Lorgeril, recruited 605 people to participate in what would be a groundbreaking clinical experiment. The individuals in this study had their differences; they weren’t all the same age (although most were middle aged), they weren’t the same gender (although most were men), they had differences relating to education level, racial background, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, height, weight, and so and on. However, there was one similarity which all these people shared, one life experience which became the the reason for their inclusion in de Lorgeril’s study: they had all experienced a myocardial infarction, commonly known as a heart attack. Continue reading